Our Challenges

Published 17:44 - 17/06/2021 Updated 10:07 - 18/06/2021

At both Southport and Ormskirk Hospitals, we face some significant challenges that are often seen in other areas of the country. Specifically, we see:


  • Both nationally and locally, hospital attendance and admissions are rising. The patient journey (or flow) through a hospital often has patients waiting too long to be seen in A&E, too long to be admitted to hospital and then too long to be discharged once they have been treated. We need to address this challenge to cope with increased demand and provide a more efficient service. Sadly, the coronavirus pandemic has also significantly impacted on this as we care for people who need to be admitted as an emergency leading to cancellations to planned treatment.


  • Staff recruitment and retention challenges affecting health and care across the area. Like many hospitals across the country, hospitals in Southport and Ormskirk are finding it hard to recruit and retain enough trained staff. It is particularly hard to recruit staff for smaller district hospitals because a lot of staff want to work in large urban areas.


  • Demographic changes involving a significant increase in the number of older people. People are living for longer and older people tend to have more complex health needs than they did when our hospital services were originally designed. So, in the future, more people will require complex care, often for more than one condition at a time, and this will affect how care is delivered. Many of our NHS buildings are out-of-date and not always suitable for our patient’s needs, particularly older and more frail patients.


  • The need for planned care is increasing, and in response we must also consider how we can improve on managing the demand, maximise our capacity, and harness relevant existing and emerging technology that will support both the demand and capacity challenges into the future.


  • The NHS continues to face financial pressures. If we can help people avoid unnecessary hospital admission by accessing care closer to home, they are likely to live the best life that they can, and money can be saved and reinvested into more patient care.


At both Southport and Ormskirk Hospitals, we face some significant challenges that are often seen in other areas of the country. Specifically, we see:


  • Both nationally and locally, hospital attendance and admissions are rising. The patient journey (or flow) through a hospital often has patients waiting too long to be seen in A&E, too long to be admitted to hospital and then too long to be discharged once they have been treated. We need to address this challenge to cope with increased demand and provide a more efficient service. Sadly, the coronavirus pandemic has also significantly impacted on this as we care for people who need to be admitted as an emergency leading to cancellations to planned treatment.


  • Staff recruitment and retention challenges affecting health and care across the area. Like many hospitals across the country, hospitals in Southport and Ormskirk are finding it hard to recruit and retain enough trained staff. It is particularly hard to recruit staff for smaller district hospitals because a lot of staff want to work in large urban areas.


  • Demographic changes involving a significant increase in the number of older people. People are living for longer and older people tend to have more complex health needs than they did when our hospital services were originally designed. So, in the future, more people will require complex care, often for more than one condition at a time, and this will affect how care is delivered. Many of our NHS buildings are out-of-date and not always suitable for our patient’s needs, particularly older and more frail patients.


  • The need for planned care is increasing, and in response we must also consider how we can improve on managing the demand, maximise our capacity, and harness relevant existing and emerging technology that will support both the demand and capacity challenges into the future.


  • The NHS continues to face financial pressures. If we can help people avoid unnecessary hospital admission by accessing care closer to home, they are likely to live the best life that they can, and money can be saved and reinvested into more patient care.